tits-mcgeek:

chlochloariadne:

respectthenightowl:

image

so this is erika linder, a female model working as a female, androgynous and male model

image

and this here is andrej pejic, a male model that works as a male, androgynous and female model

both are famous for their opposite sex and androgynous work

image

image

and they’re fucking dating.

hottest couple ever

And Andrej was scouted working at McDonald’s over here in Australia! We did good!

I would watch this sex tape…

(via kissmyasajj)

"

“The Daily Show” proved that they did not care who they offended, as long as they could make me look bad in the process. The volume of hate mail I have received in the show’s aftermath confirms their success on that front.

When asked the $2 per hour question, I responded that very few individuals would take a job at that pay, even if it were legal. In a free market, businesses compete for customers by keeping prices down, and for labor by keeping wages up. Any employer offering even low-skilled workers just $2 per hour would be outbid by others offering to pay more.

However I did suggest two groups of people who might be willing to work for $2 per hour. The first group — which was edited out — was the unpaid interns who tend to value work experience and connections more than pay. (In fact, “The Daily Show” staffer who booked me, and who was present during the interview, had been thrilled to start there as an unpaid intern). Since many interns work for free, $2 per hour would be an improvement. Some interns are even willing to pay to work. Since employers are afraid to hire them without pay for fear of violating labor laws or inviting lawsuits, they often hire young people working for college credit. These individuals are forced to pay college tuition to get a job they could have had for free had there been no minimum wage.

The other group was the intellectually disabled, who are in fact already exempt from the current minimum wage law by federal regulation. Although many have taken my support for this exemption as some sort of advocacy for modern slavery, I offered good reasons for the rule. While saying nothing about any person’s value as an individual or a human being, it is undeniable that the intellectually disabled have, in general, fewer marketable skills than the general population. Anyone arguing otherwise is just speaking from emotion. If an intellectually disabled person can’t perform work that produces a minimum wage level of output, then no employer seeking to make a profit could afford to pay that person the official minimum wage.

I further explained that since such individuals typically live with their parents or other caretakers, they are not working to support themselves or anyone else. They are working for the self-esteem associated with having a job — the pride of working and making a contribution. Many of the jobs they perform may seem mundane to those of normal intelligence, but they are often the most enjoyable and rewarding aspects of the lives of people with intellectual disabilities. I pointed out that if the federal minimum wages were to apply to them, a great many of those opportunities would vanish. Others may disagree, but I believe a job for such a person at $2 per hour is better than no job at all.

Businesses are not charities, and employers are not in business to lose money. If they do not make a profit, they go out of business — and all of their employees lose their jobs. Of course, for “The Daily Show,” all of that boiled down to my comment that “you are worth what you’re worth,” which left the impression I believe some people have little or no value.

But “The Daily Show” was never interested in an honest debate about the minimum wage. Nor is it concerned with the intellectually disabled, whom they have no qualms about offending if they can get a laugh. In fact, it’s “The Daily Show” that wants to tell the intellectually disabled they are worthless, as they want to make it illegal for them to have jobs. I did not notice any intellectually disabled people working at “The Daily Show.” I’m sure many would jump at the chance, particularly if they were offered minimum wage or higher. But since they choose to pay their intellectually capable interns zero, why should they be expected to pay the intellectually disabled more?

"

— Peter Schiff on his Daily Show appearance. (via voluntaryexchange)

(via chiefmcclane)

thesushiandcats:

lotv:

I hope this makes some of you in a better mood. Because I’m feeling quite over the day. But this helps a bit. 

This post makes me want a duck.

(Source: dailyanimals, via chiefmcclane)

"

i.

“Your name is Tasbeeh. Don’t let them call you by anything else.”

My mother speaks to me in Arabic; the command sounds more forceful in her mother tongue, a Libyan dialect that is all sharp edges and hard, guttural sounds. I am seven years old and it has never occurred to me to disobey my mother. Until twelve years old, I would believe God gave her the supernatural ability to tell when I’m lying.

“Don’t let them give you an English nickname,” my mother insists once again, “I didn’t raise amreekan.”

My mother spits out this last word with venom. Amreekan. Americans. It sounds like a curse coming out of her mouth. Eight years in this country and she’s still not convinced she lives here. She wears her headscarf tightly around her neck, wades across the school lawn in long, floor-skimming skirts. Eight years in this country and her tongue refuses to bend and soften for the English language. It embarrasses me, her heavy Arab tongue, wrapping itself so forcefully around the clumsy syllables of English, strangling them out of their meaning.

But she is fierce and fearless. I have never heard her apologize to anyone. She will hold up long grocery lines checking and double-checking the receipt in case they’re trying to cheat us. My humiliation is heavy enough for the both of us. My English is not. Sometimes I step away, so people don’t know we’re together but my dark hair and skin betray me as a member of her tribe.

On my first day of school, my mother presses a kiss to my cheek.

“Your name is Tasbeeh,” she says again, like I’ve forgotten. “Tasbeeh.”

ii.

Roll call is the worst part of my day. After a long list of Brittanys, Jonathans, Ashleys, and Yen-but-call-me-Jens, the teacher rests on my name in silence. She squints. She has never seen this combination of letters strung together in this order before. They are incomprehensible. What is this h doing at the end? Maybe it is a typo.

“Tas…?”

“Tasbeeh,” I mutter, with my hand half up in the air. “Tasbeeh.”

A pause.

“Do you go by anything else?”

“No,” I say. “Just Tasbeeh. Tas-beeh.”

“Tazbee. All right. Alex?”

She moves on before I can correct her. She said it wrong. She said it so wrong. I have never heard my name said so ugly before, like it’s a burden. Her entire face contorts as she says it, like she is expelling a distasteful thing from her mouth. She avoids saying it for the rest of the day, but she has already baptized me with this new name. It is the name everyone knows me by, now, for the next six years I am in elementary school. “Tazbee,” a name with no grace, no meaning, no history; it belongs in no language.

“Tazbee,” says one of the students on the playground, later. “Like Tazmanian Devil?” Everyone laughs. I laugh too. It is funny, if you think about it.

iii.

I do not correct anyone for years. One day, in third grade, a plane flies above our school.

“Your dad up there, Bin Laden?” The voice comes from behind. It is dripping in derision.

“My name is Tazbee,” I say. I said it in this heavy English accent, so he may know who I am. I am American. But when I turn around they are gone.

iv.

I go to middle school far, far away. It is a 30-minute drive from our house. It’s a beautiful set of buildings located a few blocks off the beach. I have never in my life seen so many blond people, so many colored irises. This is a school full of Ashtons and Penelopes, Patricks and Sophias. Beautiful names that belong to beautiful faces. The kind of names that promise a lifetime of social triumph.

I am one of two headscarved girls at this new school. We are assigned the same gym class. We are the only ones in sweatpants and long-sleeved undershirts. We are both dreading roll call. When the gym teacher pauses at my name, I am already red with humiliation.

“How do I say your name?” she asks.

“Tazbee,” I say.

“Can I just call you Tess?”

I want to say yes. Call me Tess. But my mother will know, somehow. She will see it written in my eyes. God will whisper it in her ear. Her disappointment will overwhelm me.

“No,” I say, “Please call me Tazbee.”

I don’t hear her say it for the rest of the year.

v.

My history teacher calls me Tashbah for the entire year. It does not matter how often I correct her, she reverts to that misshapen sneeze of a word. It is the ugliest conglomeration of sounds I have ever heard.

When my mother comes to parents’ night, she corrects her angrily, “Tasbeeh. Her name is Tasbeeh.” My history teacher grimaces. I want the world to swallow me up.

vi.

My college professors don’t even bother. I will only know them for a few months of the year. They smother my name in their mouths. It is a hindrance for their tongues. They hand me papers silently. One of them mumbles it unintelligibly whenever he calls on my hand. Another just calls me “T.”

My name is a burden. My name is a burden. My name is a burden. I am a burden.

vii.

On the radio I hear a story about a tribe in some remote, rural place that has no name for the color blue. They do not know what the color blue is. It has no name so it does not exist. It does not exist because it has no name.

viii.

At the start of a new semester, I walk into a math class. My teacher is blond and blue-eyed. I don’t remember his name. When he comes to mine on the roll call, he takes the requisite pause. I hold my breath.

“How do I pronounce your name?” he asks.

I say, “Just call me Tess.”

“Is that how it’s pronounced?”

I say, “No one’s ever been able to pronounce it.”

“That’s probably because they didn’t want to try,” he said. “What is your name?”

When I say my name, it feels like redemption. I have never said it this way before. Tasbeeh. He repeats it back to me several times until he’s got it. It is difficult for his American tongue. His has none of the strength, none of the force of my mother’s. But he gets it, eventually, and it sounds beautiful. I have never heard it sound so beautiful. I have never felt so deserving of a name. My name feels like a crown.

ix.

“Thank you for my name, mama.”

x.

When the barista asks me my name, sharpie poised above the coffee cup, I tell him: “My name is Tasbeeh. It’s a tough t clinging to a soft a, which melts into a silky ssss, which loosely hugs the b, and the rest of my name is a hard whisper — eeh. Tasbeeh. My name is Tasbeeh. Hold it in your mouth until it becomes a prayer. My name is a valuable undertaking. My name requires your rapt attention. Say my name in one swift note – Tasbeeeeeeeh – sand let the h heat your throat like cinnamon. Tasbeeh. My name is an endeavor. My name is a song. Tasbeeh. It means giving glory to God. Tasbeeh. Wrap your tongue around my name, unravel it with the music of your voice, and give God what he is due.”

"

Tasbeeh Herwees, The Names They Gave Me  (via libeeya)

Dumbest shit I’ve read in a while. My Opa’s name was Gustav, he went by by Gus. Did my Great-Oma wage Jihad over it? Fuck no, she actually wanted to raise Americans, unlike the filthy piece of shit mother in this story.

(Source: rabbrakha, via chiefmcclane)

elpatron56:

livingthathipsterlife:

sincerely,
all college students

I have shared my thoughts on this picture before.
You’re not entitled to what belongs to other people. You can’t take someone’s iron ore from their property, hijack someone’s metallurgy business to get steel and force a machinist to make a gun on his lathe and milling machine.
You can’t force someone to share his knowledge. If you want knowledge, there are universities that put their entire course resources online and there’s those things called libraries, from which you can obtain a considerable amount of knowledge for the price of a library card and some overdue fees.
But knowledge =/= education.
A gun is made from a piece of steel, aluminium and in many cases even some polymer that was molded to shape. The raw materials aren’t too expensive, the machining costs aren’t too exorbitant and there’s also the expenses in shipping, gunshop profit margin, etc. Overall a gun can be made in a few hours and arrive at it’s place of sale in a few days.
An education is a continuous process that requires the labour of teachers, janitors, the maintenance of classrooms, etc and as you know, the hourly wages of all the people working at a college make up a small fortune every year.
Both aren’t terribly hard to obtain - one just costs much more because of all the work and infrastructure required. The cost is also aggravated by consumer demand - which is far too high - and the federal loans shenanigans. But that’s another discussion - nobody is entitled to force others to give them stuff.
I say this as a college student.

elpatron56:

livingthathipsterlife:

sincerely,

all college students

I have shared my thoughts on this picture before.

You’re not entitled to what belongs to other people. You can’t take someone’s iron ore from their property, hijack someone’s metallurgy business to get steel and force a machinist to make a gun on his lathe and milling machine.

You can’t force someone to share his knowledge. If you want knowledge, there are universities that put their entire course resources online and there’s those things called libraries, from which you can obtain a considerable amount of knowledge for the price of a library card and some overdue fees.

But knowledge =/= education.

A gun is made from a piece of steel, aluminium and in many cases even some polymer that was molded to shape. The raw materials aren’t too expensive, the machining costs aren’t too exorbitant and there’s also the expenses in shipping, gunshop profit margin, etc. Overall a gun can be made in a few hours and arrive at it’s place of sale in a few days.

An education is a continuous process that requires the labour of teachers, janitors, the maintenance of classrooms, etc and as you know, the hourly wages of all the people working at a college make up a small fortune every year.

Both aren’t terribly hard to obtain - one just costs much more because of all the work and infrastructure required. The cost is also aggravated by consumer demand - which is far too high - and the federal loans shenanigans. But that’s another discussion - nobody is entitled to force others to give them stuff.

I say this as a college student.

(via chiefmcclane)

vietnamwarera:

M60 machine gunner of the 25th Infantry Division, 1968

My Dad carried “The Pig” in the ‘Nam with the 25th ID (1/35 Inf). I carried it in the Gulf with 1st ID (2/16 Inf)

vietnamwarera:

M60 machine gunner of the 25th Infantry Division, 1968

My Dad carried “The Pig” in the ‘Nam with the 25th ID (1/35 Inf). I carried it in the Gulf with 1st ID (2/16 Inf)

(via dirty-gunz)

theperksofbeingasmallflower:

twiabp:

got a racist response while applying to colleges in the uk, and the social justice in me just couldn’t not respond.

chingchongfuckinglinglong

I’m lost to how this is racist.

(via chiefmcclane)


On November 8, 2004 the American army launched a large-scale offensive on the Iraqi city of Fallujah. The city was a Sunni bulwark where thousands of resistance fighters under the command of al-Zarqawi, the reputed leader of al Qaida in Iraq, were in hiding. Embedded with Charlie Company of the American Marines, Jérôme Sessini recorded how the Marines went from house to house to eliminate the resistance fighters and pile up their corpses.

Don’t Fuck with the Jarheads! We will eat your souls :)
"

“We’re so bad at sex and then we wonder why women aren’t like, really aggressive about sex. We think it’s cause they don’t have as much desire as we do. That’s how stupid men are, that we think ‘they’re just weird, women are like fucked up in the head cause they don’t wanna just fuck all the time. If I was a women, I’d just fuck everybody. Why don’t they wanna fuck all the time? I do’. Of course you do, cause when you fuck, you get to fuck a woman! When she fucks, she has to fuck a guy! Wildly different experiences. For a man, 100% of the time, it’s the greatest thing that ever happened in his entire life. For a woman, about 40% of the time, when she’s being fucked by a guy, she’s thinking ‘I’ll get over this in a week. It’s not the worst thing. I’m not gonna cry this time’


“Another thing that proves how bad men are at sex is that after sex, you’re looking at two very different people. The man just wants to lay there, be cool and the woman wants to cuddle…’Why is she so NEEDY?’ She’s not needy you idiot, she’s horny, because you did nothing for her. YOU DID ABSOLUTELY NOTHING. HER PUSSY IS ON FIRE BECAUSE IT’S GONE UNFUCKED COMPLETELY. Of course you’re fine, you climbed on and went “KFHGSKG” and rolled off. And she’s on you because she’s like ‘WH-at SOMETHING ELSE HAS TO HAPPEN, THIS IS BULLSHIT!!” If you fuck a woman well, she will LEAVE YOU ALONE. ‘Thanks a lot buddy, zzzzz’”

"

Oh, Louis CK, advocate for the female orgasm. (via wantonmasochist)

Word.

(via xhourspass)

That is why I make sure my Wife cums like I vote… Early and Often!

(Source: moscowisburning, via kissmyasajj)

chiefmcclane:

How to be a Reverse Racist

Racism is not a dichotomous issue.
Therefore the term “reverse racism” is dumb because it implies that it only goes one way.

I can’t help it if your ancestors couldn’t fight.

(Source: majiinboo)